Showing posts with label Singer. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Singer. Show all posts

Thursday, May 24, 2018

How To SING From The Diaphragm

Diaphragma - Photo: Wikimediahttps://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fa/Diaphragma.jpg
You must have heard people saying "Sing from your diaphragm", but what exactly do they mean? How can your diaphragm sing? What they actually mean is to use your diaphragm to control your singing breath.

Well, you must actually practice with good vocal exercises to perfect your singing breath. Singing from the diaphragm is a complex muscle/breath coordination that many singing teachers find it difficult to their students in words effectively. That is why there is so much confusion on this topic.

Just to give you an idea of how your diaphragm works when you are breathing, try this breathing exercise. Stand up straight with a relaxed posture, and then take a big yawn - Ahhhhhh! While you are taking that big yawn, notice how your tummy expands outwards? That is the diaphragm at work, pushing out your tummy so that your lungs can drop lower so that you can take in more air.

Now the diaphragm muscle is also used for the control of airflow by sending the correct amount of air to the vocal cords. As you sing the higher notes, less air is required for the vocal cords. By sending the correct amount of air, your voice quality will be stable and relaxed and the overall singing voice will sound so much better.

However, you need to practice with the correct vocal exercises until "singing from the diaphragm" is an ingrained habit so that you don't even have to think of it when you are singing because you are automatically using this singing technique. You don't even need to remember how much air to release to your diaphragm because you will be releasing just the right amount of air naturally.

Contrary to popular belief, you do not need breathing exercises for singing to strengthen your diaphragm! The muscles in your diaphragm are already strong enough already as it is. This is because your vocal cords are very small and delicate muscles and thus do not require too much support.

Since this is an article, it is not possible to show you the vocal exercises breathing technique demonstrations. However, you can get a feel for it by experimenting with this exercise.

Now put your palms lightly on your tummy. Take in a deep long breath. As you are breathing in, extend your tummy outward and sideways as the air comes in. When you breathe out, pursed your lips together to release a controlled stream of air and at the same time, with your tummy becoming smaller and back to its natural state as air is being released. Now, this is how you will feel when you are singing from the diaphragm.



Tuesday, May 22, 2018

What Is a POWER SONG and Where Do I Get Mine?

Native American "conjuror" in a 1590...
Native American "conjuror" in a 1590 engraving (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Power Songs are oral prayers expressing your true self, your nature, your individuality, your power. All cultures have power songs but you can have your own power song too. We think of the power in a hymn or an African chant, a Shamanic ceremony song or even in the howling of a wolf. And there is definite power in sound.

All Shamans have several power songs because the vibration of the notes in the voice and in the fourth chakra of the throat stimulate sympathetic vibrations in the universe to respond. Everything is connected. What you put out comes back to you. When a butterfly flutters his wings in Cost Rica the winds of Africa are stirred. And when a sound is offered, the universe responds.

Power songs are used in preparation for journeying, healing, offering Reiki, praying, grounding, for protection, for celebration, for solace, anytime you want to connect with the universe in this very special way.

To demonstrate the power of voice and musical notes I would like to you try this exercise.

The fourth chakra is the note FA as in Do Re Me FA. Find a piano and discover the sound of this note if possible. Or find your own closest approximation to it. It is important to find the sound of FA. It is the F key above middle C on the piano but any F key in any octave will also work.

The fourth note or sound of FA is also the note of manifestation or creation upon this planet. So if we want to manifest healing, for example, we can send our intention out upon the note FA into the universe and healing will resonate with our voice of FA and become manifest where we are intending. It really is that simple.

Don't try to complicate it like so many others have. This little simple secret is one that some people have paid thousands of dollars for. Some people have made millions creating musical tapes based on the sound of Fa, subliminal, holosync tapes that offer healing are based on the sound FA. But now you know how to do it yourself.

The visual symbol for the universe made manifest is the square. This symbolizes the power of thought and vibration becoming solid and material in this apparent world. So let’s combine the sound of Fa with the visualization of a square.

Get yourself someplace comfortable where you will not be disturbed for a while. Close your eyes and visualize a square. Intone the sound FA and watch the square and see what image appears there.

You can also do this backward by visualizing the person you want to heal in the square and intoning the sound of FA. Or anything that you would like to manifest for the good of yourself and the world.

Shamans use this technique all the time. The last ingredient the Shaman uses here is desire or strong will. He or she really wants this healing to happen, they can really feel the wish, they put all their emotional energy into the intent.


I often get to dancing and rattling while I intone my power song and bring my whole body into the act of intending a healing for someone. The more feeling you put into it, the stronger the vibration.

Have you ever listened to a Native American song? There is usually one major tone for the song, isn't there! Now you know why!

As a final thought, each note in the scale represents a unique vibratory pattern in the universe. You could do a study to find those out if you would like to know more about sound.

So you see the need for your own power song. Create one this week. it is usually just a line or two repeated over and over. You can use words or vowels or an imaginary language. As long as you create it with FA as your base and emotion and intent, it will be perfect. Power songs are usually kept private and seldom sung in public. The only time they are sung in public is when a group of Shamans has gathered to do a combined healing. It is your prayer to the universe.


    Come Walk With A Shaman Indigenous Traditional Shaman Elder Maggie Wahls offers an introductory course starting with the history of Shamanism around the world. You learn about healing herbs, finding your totem, what Shamanic ecstasy is and how to achieve it without drugs, how to meditate and many actual visualizations to help improve one's skills and much more. To Start Today visit: www.shamanelder.com Article Directory: Article Dashboard



Tuesday, May 15, 2018

10 Tips to Help Improve Your SINGING VOICE

Portrait of Harry Belafonte, singing, 1954 Feb...
Portrait of Harry Belafonte, singing, 1954 Feb. 18.
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Need a little help to improve your singing voice? Here are 10 tips to help you reach your potential!

1. Breath from the diaphragm, not the lungs. You need to really control the air that you're expelling when you sing, and breathing from the diaphragm gives you more air to work with. To do this, breathe so that your stomach goes out rather than your chest when you inhale. When you practice, try to focus on using the same amount of air for low notes and high notes. This will help erase the break between your registers and give you more steady tone.

2. Run through scales-a lot. If this was guitar, it wouldn't be different, and the human voice is a lot less accurate than a guitar. You need to get your sense of pitch down, and you need to train your voice to reach higher and higher if you want to really hit all the notes in your range.

3. Don't strain your voice. Practice is a good thing, but don't try to sing too high or you might damage your vocal cords. Go slow and steady and you'll sing well in no time. Keep your practice time to an hour or so a day, then move up if you feel like it. If you ever feel like your voice is straining, or if you feel soreness or pain, stop right away.

4. Listen to criticism. Singing well takes a long time, and in the meantime, you're going to hear people say a lot of bad things about you. If you notice a trend, recognize that people are probably making a good judgment and try to work on the problem aspect of your voice. Don't let anyone get you down who really has nothing to say other than, "you suck," though. You don't see them trying to do this, and they have no idea what they're talking about.

5. Make recordings of yourself. This is the only way to hear your problems because you can separate yourself from your voice and listen to what other people hear. You may not like this at first, but keep at it; you'll improve vastly, and you'll start to notice stuff you like about your voice and really expand on those things.

6. Talk to established singers. Most of them will be happy to give you some tips and exercises that helped them out, and any time you need to ask for directions, the best idea is to ask the person that's already at your destination.

7. Eat and drink well. Don't do anything that'll dry out your voice and stop you from singing well. Caffeine is bad, as is anything that causes mucous buildup like dairy products (milk, in particular, is a very bad choice). Don't smoke or drink too much; this can really make you sing poorly. One famous case of booze and cigarettes ruining a classic voice is Harry Nilsson, who shred his vocal cords while working on his "Pussycats" album with John Lennon and ended up carrying a bucket with him to spit blood into during the recording session. His fantastic voice eventually improved and sounded great, but he never could sing quite as well again; his highest register was permanently damaged.

8. Sing for the style. If you're singing country, listen to country singers; if you're singing rock, listen to rock singers. Notice things that are the same in each style and emulate those. Be careful, however, to keep your voice unique, and not to simply copy another singer's voice. Make your personality come out in your music.


9. Experiment with different sounds. Certain noises, like a really nasal note, can help you expand your range if you practice with them. Ask singers for their suggestions, and take them up on it.

10. Finally, stay positive! If you've had a few bad scales, that doesn't mean your voice is going to be bad all day. Drink some warm tea and try again. Don't get down on yourself, and don't think that your voice is bad, or it certainly will be. I know how stupid that sounds, but the mindset is definitely a big part of singing, and if you don't think you sound good, neither will anyone else.

If you are a social singer or someone looking for a career using their voice you can benefit from a little training. Online learn to sing software is not better than ever and can help you get started right away! Click below to find out what is available and what suits your needs best!



Thursday, April 19, 2018

MARIO LANZA 1921-1959

Image of Mario Lanza used for promotional purp...
Image of Mario Lanza used for promotional purposes for the film Serenade. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Mario Lanza was undoubtedly one of the most loved Tenors of all time, his emotional renditions of famous arias and ballads have left a lasting legacy for all time. Born Arnold Alfredo Cocozza in 1921 (The year Enrico Caruso died), he inspired so many modern tenors to have a career in the opera houses of the world.

He had a meteoric rise to fame, and his career went the way of films, where he soon became a matinee idol. Here is a list of his films.
That Midnight Kiss (1949) with Kathryn Grayson
The Toast of New Orleans (1950) with Kathryn Grayson
The Great Caruso (1951) with Ann Blyth. Many consider this to be Lanza,s finest role.
Because Your Mine (1952) with Dorretta Morrow
The Student Prince (1954) Although Mario Lanza,s voice was used in this film, he did not appear in it personally.
Serenade (1956) All about a rising opera star! with Joan Fontaine.
Seven Hills of Rome (1957) with Renato Rascel and Marisa allasio.
For The First Time (1959) with Johanna Van Kozian and Zsa Zsa Gabor.
He truly had a gift that is only granted once or twice in one or two centuries, Mario could take a simple Neapolitan love song and turn it into an aria. Once you heard him perform it is often said that he made it his own, and no other could sing it like him with so much excitement and feeling. One such song is Core N Grato.

There are many stories abound about why he did not appear in "The Student Prince", I have in the past heard that he would disappear and binge on food, and his weight would balloon up and down. Another angle is a disagreement on the music, all conjecture and I wonder if anyone outside of his family really knows the truth, about this and his untimely death in 1959. (Another can of worms).

With that said let's just marvel at his talent and be thankful for a career (although brief), that has and continues to bring a lot of pleasure to all that hear him.


Whether you are a fan of Mario Lanza or not, you cannot help but be moved by at least one of his aria,s or ballads. It is like a fine wine "Once tasted never forgotten" and the world will never forget Mario Lanza's rendition of the "Drinking Song" amongst a host of others to take pleasure in.





Saturday, March 17, 2018

Learn Good SINGING Breath Control

English: Animation of a diaphragm exhaling and...
Animation of a diaphragm exhaling and inhaling
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Good breathing technique is crucial for voice control when singing and every self-respecting singer should learn and master this technique. Singers will never be able to sing powerfully, sustain a tone gracefully and sing with passion without mastering good breath control technique.

When you are drawing in breath for singing, breathe from the bottom of your lungs upwards. When good breathing technique is mastered, you will be able to feel the breath all around your lower abdomen, not just at the front. Your chest and shoulders may begin to lift as you draw in your breath but do not let them lift or else the singing voice will sound strained and tensed.

You will be frustrated with your singing effort if shallow breathing is your breath control foundation. Shallow breathing is air stored in your upper lungs where your throat and the upper chest meet. Correct and good breathing technique begins with the diaphragm and the breath support muscles.

The key to the correct use of diaphragm and breath support muscles is the expansion of your lower abdomen when taking in your singing breath. You have to exercise and develop this technique until it comes naturally to you as a breathing habit even when you are breathing normally when not singing.

As you are practicing your singing breath control technique, do take notice of how much noise you make when you draw your breath. This is because many singers believe that a noisy breath is a deep breath which is not true.

When you breathe, take sips of air and not gulps. Silent quiet breathing should be the aim of a good breathing technique. Again, practice silent quiet breathing until the technique becomes ingrained into your natural singing habit.

Noisy breathing is usually caused by a constricted throat and is an obvious indication of shallow breathing contrary to what many singers think. If you are afraid to expand your tummy when you are taking in your singing breath for fear of looking fat, this will lead to having tension in your tummy and your diaphragm with its breath support muscles will not be working at its peak as they ought to be.

Most singers are not even aware that they are holding back all these tensions. One of the most important techniques for good singing is to relax so that you can achieve the so-called 'floating voice'. With so much tension in the singing support system, the relaxed floating voice will be difficult, if not impossible to achieve.

This tension is probably caused by years of stomach in-chest out posture inculcated since young. Now, let's start with a vocal exercise to learn good singing breath control.

Start with taking a few silent quiet breaths. As you draw in the air, expand your lower abdominal all around including the sides and the lower back. Make a mental note of how a quiet breath feels like.

Next, release the air steadily and singing the vowel 'Ahhh' as you release the air with your tummy going back to its original position.



Have you noticed that the vocal sound quality that you have just produced is steadier and has a floating tone attached to it?

It must be emphasized that the amount of air required for good singing is actually very little and so a proper amount of air attached to a note should be just adequate.

Learning and mastering this singing breath control technique will take you on your way to becoming a much better singer.



Thursday, January 25, 2018

Your SINGING Career

Singing Girl - Photo: Pixabay
As a former talent booking agent with the William Morris Agency, I know the struggles and the emotional whirlwinds that often face young singers attempting to find their niche in the music industry.   Satisfying the desire to become successful in the music industry is not easily achieved or obtained, but those who make it, are well aware of the rewards.

In an effort to increase your odds and to obtain any “real” recognition in the music industry, whether as an artist, jingle singer, or just plain session singing, let’s take a closer look at a few factors that might increase your odds.  Notice, I didn’t say do this or that and it’s a done deal.  If you’re familiar at all with the music industry you are well too familiar that some make it with virtually no talent at all and others, with incredible style, look and drive, never even get the slightest nod from music industry executives.

To begin with – What’s your career blueprint look like?  What are you doing from a pre-determined game plan right now?  Have you actually taken the time over a cup of coffee and sat down with a pad and pencil and jotted down 

1) your goals, short-term, and long-term 
2) your overall game plan and 
3) how you are going to implement your to-do list to get to your end goal?  

I’m surprised to learn how few really get this far.  Sure, many sit in the car or on the couch “thinking about life and their career” and have a general idea, but until you put it down on paper and follow through with a course of action, you might as well forget it.  Start by writing down your goals with a course of action and break it down with what you can do this month, this week and what I can get done today -  This will help you to not only stay focused but give you the boost when you feel like giving up.

Next, now that you’ve figured out what you want to do and how you’re going to go about doing it with a set blueprint, what does your demo sound like?  It can’t just sound pretty good – And yes, this does take time and money - $75 demos won’t get the job done.  Good and pretty good won’t get it – It has to knock their socks off and turn the heads of the listeners.  Yes, as I mentioned earlier, some with virtually little talent get in, but what I’m talking about here is reflected in an overall picture of what’s being sent to the A&R director, producer, etc.  Not only does this demo sound great, but “Should we use it as the final mix in the CD, because it’s already in the pocket and we won’t have to spend any more production money re-cutting any of these songs.”   That’s how good your demo’s should be – And as an aspiring jingle singer, don’t settle for a “mom and pop” or car commercially sounding demo reel.  Your jingles ought to sound like they’re national TV and radio spots like you’ve already arrived.

The next important element, almost as important as the music itself, is your press kit and how you present yourself to industry professionals.  I will break this up into 2 segments the first on the artist press kit and secondly phone calls and interviews.  Anything that you send out in print or on your CD, has got to look like you’re established and you’ve already made it.  Make sure that your CD covers are printed on gloss paper with high-quality photographs of you or the band.  Managers, producers, and A&R directors alike are more inclined to pick up an act that looks together.  They don’t have time to figure out if this poorly imaged act has what it takes or not – And they very well might – But they don’t have the presentation.  In here lies what I consider to be your greatest ally.  If you will spend time and money to have your artist press kit not only look professional but with an edge, you can convey 1) your image, 2) your marketability, 3) and your dedication and sincerity – This is not a fleeting moment or idea for you.  You’re in this for the long haul and your presentation states that.  Make anything in print that you send out, shine.





The next part of your presentation is in the phone calls, meetings, and grin and grip events, whether concerts, showcases or otherwise.  If you don’t have a natural ability to interact with individuals, you are going to have to practice.  And furthermore, there’s nothing wrong, and I would suggest, writing down on paper anything that you want to come to mind before a phone conversation even begins.  If you’re bad with names, as many of us are, have those names written down, easily obtained in the middle of a call.  Prepare as much as you can before the conversation and be honest.  Honesty goes long ways with people.  Most in the industry have “heard it all” and it’s so refreshing to hear somebody state, “I’m not sure, but I’ll find out.”  Speak with sincerity, honesty, but with confidence as well.  After all, you’ve got something unique and it’s your vocal career.  You need to sell them, but they also need to recognize the obvious, and that is that they’ve just discovered the next…

So as you begin or at least start looking at your singing career, look at these simple to implement principals that we have just looked at and know ahead of time that you are going to be specific, analytic, and purposeful in your singing career strategies.  Take a look at your strengths and weaknesses and be honest.  Ask others.  Don’t be afraid to change course or look at other singing alternatives as well.  We know that short articles are difficult to present every point of the equation, so don’t hesitate to contact us should you have further questions.

Author: Tom Gauger



Friday, December 22, 2017

Professional OPERA SINGER Voice Types: The TENOR

Leo Slezak (1873 – 1946), tenor opera singer a...
Leo Slezak (1873 – 1946), tenor opera singer and actor
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
We all know how thrilling it is to hear a live professional opera singer. Even on a recording, it is something quite special, but nothing really beats seeing and hearing a professional opera singer in the flesh.

A tenor is the second highest male voice with the highest being the countertenor. As with any operatic voice type, each voice has several sub-categories. There is the lyric tenor who sings a lot of Puccini and Verdi, there is the Mozartian tenor, and the Heldentenor who sings Wagner to name but a few. In this article, we will take a look at some types of tenor voice types, and name some popular, very difficult, tenor arias relating to those voices.

1. Di quella pira from Verdi's Il Trovatore

This is a dramatic aria, both in character and plot-wise. When Manrico (the dramatic tenor singing this aria) learns that his mother, Acuzena, is about to be burnt at the stake, he gathers all his soldiers around him and tells them what has to be done. Manrico is outraged and Verdi conveys this through his music. You can hear his anger and the sense of drama is heightened by the rhythm. This aria isn't demanding in the sense that it doesn't have lots of high Cs, yet it is one of the most difficult ones in the operatic repertoire. It requires the tenor to have real muscle to his sound and when the high C finally comes, it is worth the wait! This aria is sung by a dramatic tenor and when you hear it, you understand why.


2. Ah mes amis from Donizetti's La Fille du Regiment

This aria certainly has high C's. Ah mes amis, sometimes referred to as the ten high Cs aria, is filled with them. The character of this aria is light, melodic and beautiful. Of course, it is thrilling as you just can't wait for the high Cs to come. This aria requires an easy high lying tenor voice, namely a light tenor.


3. Che gelida manina by Puccini from La Bohème

This is a classic tenor aria from one of the most loved operas ever written. This piece, as well as most other arias and duets from La Bohème, are pieces you often come across at opera galas, corporate entertainment events, and singing waiter performances. The hero, Rodolfo, has just met the love of his life, Mimì (a lyric soprano), and sings of how cold her hand is. It is sensitive, has beautiful melodic vocal lines and a lush, rich orchestration. This would be sung by a lyric tenor.

There is nothing that beats the experience of hearing a professional opera singer live. Hopefully, the time you next go to an opera gala, an operatic corporate entertainment event, or even a performance at an opera house, you will feel you know a little bit more about the tenor voice.



Monday, October 23, 2017

How To Preserve Good SINGING VOICE

Portrait of Harry Belafonte, singing, 1954 Feb...
Portrait of Harry Belafonte
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
Good professional singers not only have to be fit and healthy to look good for stage performances, they must also know how to maintain and preserve a good singing voice.

You have only one voice and when your voice is damaged permanently, it will probably spell the end of a singer's. Many singers who have not been through professional singing coaching by good singing coaches or attend any singing schools may not even know that they may be damaging their voice.

Many singers also forget that when their singing voice does not feel right and they are not singing effortlessly as they should be, they will have a tendency to compensate for bad and unhealthy singing habits. These newly created or old bad habits may become stuck unconsciously and will have to be unlearned with the right vocal exercises. That is if the singer is aware that such habits are already in existence in the first place.

There are many things you can do to damage your singing voice and sometimes the damage will lead to permanent damage to your vocal chords. Here are some examples of what can harm your voice and there are much more.

a) Constant screaming or talking forcefully all the time. This happens very often if you are singing in a night club environment where you have to speak above the din to be heard.
Making funny voices maybe cute, but you may be doing terrible damages to your vocal folds.
b) Dry air and/or not enough water consumption will dry up your larynx and thus placing too much friction on them.
c) Poor diet, lack of sleep, stress will place more toll on your body and your singing mechanism.
d) Caffeine consumption, alcohol consumption, smoking will also damage your voice.
e) Talking, singing or whispering when you have laryngitis or sore throat. You need to rest your voice when you have a sore throat.

True professional singers must spend a lifetime working to minimize the stresses on their voices. Why should they want to destroy their singing career by being ignorant about what these bad habits can do to their singing?

What is more, if the voice is damaged because of frequent abuse and polyps grow on the larynx, they may even need to go for a surgery to remove the polyps. That will mean an of income and avoidable medical expenses. So you must preserve and maintain a healthy singing voice if you want to have a successful singing career.




Sunday, August 20, 2017

GOOD SINGING Tone Quality

Glottal cycle, animated
Glottal cycle, animated (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
A common pursuit amongst singers is the quest for a good head and chest voice/tone resonance. Although we have discussed to some extent about head/chest resonance in previous articles, there will still be a lot of confusion on this subject such as balancing tonal brilliance and depth of the resonance.

Blending these two voice qualities or vocal colors is a major source of confusion and frustration for many aspiring singers. However, once you understand how the voice work, blending the vocal colors should become easy and automatic as speaking expressively.

In fact, once you are able to blend the tones, you will begin to sing with more emotion and passion because you will know how to create the tones that will draw out the feelings and the emotions of the songs that you are singing. Some people call it singing with feeling.

It is well established that the head resonance, when properly supported, has a brilliant ringing tone quality as compared to the chest resonance singing tone. This bright voice tone is developed in the bones and cavities above and, behind and around the nose known as the mask.

The result from an unsupported head resonance is very different and is characterized by a false falsetto tone. This oddity occurs when a singer suddenly switches into a choir boy tone.

The resonators have a lot to do with what your voice sounds like. This is why you can listen to many singers with high voices and yet each of them will have a different blend of sound and tonal quality.

Now try this experiment to feel the resonating system of the head. Gently tap your finger on the bone between the upper lip and the nose. Can you hear the gentle thud it made? Now tap the bridge of your nose and then your forehead just below your hairline and again listen to the thugs again.

Did you notice that the thuds were higher in pitch as you ascend from the lip to the forehead? By performing this experiment, you will know that certain bones are predisposed to amplify various pitch levels.

When singers refer to chest resonance, they are actually talking about vocal tone which is characterized by darker vowel qualities or mellowness. However, the term is a misnomer. By dictionary definition, an effective resonating chamber is a hollow place surrounded by hard surfaces. However, the chest is too full of organs to be suitable for amplifying the singing tone.



Throat and chest resonance occurs where there is plenty of empty space for amplification of the lower vibrations created by the vocal cords in the mouth and throat. Contrary to popular thinking, most so-called "chest resonance" actually comes from the throat. However, there is also a distinct sensation of vibration in the chest when singing, especially in the sternum or breastbone area. This feel of tone gathering in the chest area can be used very effectively to stabilize high notes.

So in order to get good singing tone, then you must practice with the right vocal exercises to blend the head and chest tone.




Saturday, May 27, 2017

How To SING Like An Angel and Create Beautiful VOCAL Tones

Singing Cast
Singing Cast (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
One of the more challenging tasks of becoming a singer is creating beautiful vocal tones while singing. This is a work in progress and any "singer" who says that he has his tonal work figured out is probably not the best model for a beginning singer.

The first step in creating beautiful vocal sounds is by exploring your voice's unique tonal qualities. Here are three steps that will reveal to you the actual tonal quality of your singing voice:

1. Draw a breath and try to sigh for as long as possible. It pays to be relaxed when performing this vocal exercise.

Your muscles should be loose and flexible when you sigh, especially the muscles around the head, throat, and shoulders. Make sure that your posture is correct when singing.

2. The next exercise will help reveal your high and low notes. To explore your high and low notes, take a deep breath and imitate the sound of a loud siren.

Make sure that you imitate the low and high intervals of a siren. Listen to your siren imitation or you can even record it to so you can examine your voice later.

3. Lastly, imagine that you have become a millionaire overnight. Whoop as loudly as you can, and as many times as you want. The loud whooping sound also releases your vocal quality.

When you are done exploring your voice's tonal quality, try to find songs that match that tone. You may be surprised at the variety of songs that you can easily perform using that unique voice of yours!

You see, it is important that you always learn from listening to your own voice. Singing voices can always be improved with method, remember that. A non-singer with some talent can become a superstar with the right method. We can't all be like the late Whitney Houston or John Legends, so for those of us who need to learn how to sing, we must focus on the best techniques.T

The next step to creating beautiful vocal tones is to learn now to properly release your vocal power.

1. Before singing, gently massage all of the muscles surrounding the face, jaws, neck, and shoulder area. These are your "final frontier" muscles, since they will be fully responsible for making the final transmission/projection of your voice. If muscles around these areas are not relaxed, you will not be able to sing with ease.

2. People usually use their chin as a reference point when opening their mouth. This is not the way to do it when you are singing. Instead of using your chin as a reference point, I want you to release your jaw using your lower jaw hinge as a reference point. Your chin should drop straight down but the conscious movement should be centered on the lower jaw's hinge

The last step to producing angelic vocal tones is knowing how to position your voice box or larynx for optimal tone. Yes, believe it or not, it can be done!

The larynx or voice box is made of flexible, cartilaginous tissue that vibrates to create the sound that you hear when you sing or talk. This amazing organ is capable of producing hundreds of different sounds. You only have to know how to produce the sound yourself, and the voice box will be responsible for generating the sound that you want to hear.



The voice box works better if it generates sound from a low position on your throat. How will you do that? Should you push it down with your finger? Definitely not, as this might cause physical damage to your voice box.

Instead of touching your voice box, I want you to smell the air as if you smelled the most delicious food in the world. Why? Because when a person smells this way, even the throat muscles respond, and the movement automatically lowers the position of the larynx. At this position the larynx is ready to produce a wider range of tones, from low bass to high soprano.

There you have it. Now you have the tools to create beautiful vocal tones.

    By Jamie Richards
    My name is Jamie and I've been teaching countless students how to sing for more than ten years. In that time, I've gained a lot of knowledge about the best methods that novice singers should learn if they really want to learn how to sing.
    As a vocal coach and music teacher, it is my goal to help anyone who wishes to advance their singing skills, so I'd like to share my knowledge with you, free of charge.

    Article Source: EzineArticles


Friday, April 14, 2017

How To Front Your Own Band As A LEAD SINGER

Fronting their own band is a dream of every beginner singer. So how can you front a band and develop your own band's own distinctive style of music and performance? How to at the same time developing your own individually unique singing style? How are you going to be distinguished and get noticed from those thousands of bands playing only cover versions of popular music and imitating their favourite bands and lead singers?

Sheryl Crow and Mick Jagger during the Licks Tour
Sheryl Crow and Mick Jagger during the Licks Tour
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
First thing to do is to view as many DVD performances of famous singers fronting their bands from the musical genre you have chosen as the forte of your band's music. Examine how distinctive and different they are from each other. Notice each band playing with their own style and song delivery. Take note of everyone's body language and what signals and vibes the famous bands and singers are sending out.

Let us take a look at some of these singers and bands. Take Mick Jagger of The Rolling Stones for example. See how he pouts his lips and struts on stage cockily exuding sensual visuals and confident charisma at the same time. Those body language became his characteristics and singing charisma. In the advertisement world,it is called image branding.

If someone were to name you some popular singers, you will immediately associate a clear mental picture of that singer during a performance. That is how powerful your body language and distinctive branding can be. In otherwords, be different from the crowd by developing your own style of singing and performance.

Just try it. Close your eyes and when someone mentions to you these names, what do you see in your mental picture? Elvis Presley, Boy George, Bono of U2, Kate Bush, Cindy Lauper, Michael Jackson and even The Village People. Get the picture? (pun not intended, grin)

So, you must develop your own distinctive style of singing and stage performance to get noticed and create a brand for your band.

Learn from those excellent singers fronting their own bands. Learn from them how they keep time and rythym when they move on stage? Which action and movement during their performances that drew audience reactions? How do these singers whip their fans into a frenzy? What are the facial expressions at every stage of a song? How do they tell an emotional story from the lyrics of the songs that get people moved?

Learn and borrow some traits from these singers, and then develop them further with your own unique singing style blended in.

Once you have developed your personal distinctive singing style, the next step is to rehearse with your band. Your band must know what you want and this must be communicated before every rehearsal and reinforced. Things like when you want to bring the song into a climax, when to bring it down to tug at audience heartstrings, when to pause to create a dramatic impact...etc

Invest a little moeny in your band by buying some good music sheets so that the band can play together as a team with the same music sheets and scores.If you leave your band members to play by ear, all the band members will interpret the songs in their own way and you would have lost alot of time and energy to get the band to play tightly together.



Therefore you need to work closely with your band members since as a lead singer, you are probably the band leader as well. You then must insist that the band play the keys that you are comfortable to sing in, stick to the musical arrangements and follow the effects of the songs you want to portray.

Once this is done, rehearse until the band and you are inseparable components of the song, then you are there! You are now ready to front a good band as a lead singer, get recognized as a singer and band leader of distinction.



Monday, January 16, 2017

Your SINGING Career

As a former talent booking agent with the William Morris Agency, I know the struggles and the emotional whirlwinds that often face young singers attempting to find their niche in the music industry.   Satisfying the desire to become successful in the music industry is not easily achieved or obtained, but those who make it, are well aware of the rewards.

In an effort to increase your odds and to obtain any “real” recognition in the music industry, whether as an artist, jingle singer, or just plain session singing, let’s take a closer look at a few factors that might increase your odds.  Notice, I didn’t say do this or that and it’s a done deal.  If you’re familiar at all with the music industry you are well too familiar that some make it with virtually no talent at all and others, with incredible style, look and drive, never even get the slightest nod from music industry executives.



To begin with – What’s your career blueprint look like?  What are you doing from a pre-determined game plan right now?  Have you actually taken the time over a cup of coffee and sat down with a pad and pencil and jotted down 1) your goals, short term and long term 2) your overall game plan and 3) how you are going to implement your to do list to get to your end goal?

I’m surprised to learn how few really get this far.  Sure, many sit in the car or on the couch “thinking about life and their career” and have a general idea, but until you put it down on paper and follow through with a course of action, you might as well forget it.  Start by writing down your goals with a course of action and break it down with what you can do this month, this week and what I can get done today -  This will help you to not only stay focused, but give you the boost when you feel like giving up.

Next, now that you’ve figured out what you want to do and how you’re going to go about doing it with a set blueprint, what does your demo sound like?  It can’t just sound pretty good – And yes, this does take time and money - $75 demos won’t get the job done.  Good and pretty good won’t get it – It has to knock their socks off and turn the heads of the listeners.  Yes, as I mentioned earlier, some with virtually little talent get in, but what I’m talking about here is reflected in an overall picture of what’s being sent to the A&R director, producer, etc.  

Not only does this demo sound great, but “Should we use it as the final mix in the CD, because it’s already in the pocket and we won’t have to spend anymore production money re-cutting any of these songs.”   That’s how good your demo’s should be – And as an aspiring jingle singer, don’t settle for a “mom and pop” or car commercially sounding demo reel.  Your jingles ought to sound like they’re national TV and radio spots like you’ve already arrived.

The next important element, almost as important as the music itself, is your press kit and how you present yourself to industry professionals.  I will break this up into 2 segments the first on the artist press kit and secondly phone calls and interviews.  Anything that you send out in print or on your CD, has got to look like you’re established and you’ve already made it.  Make sure that your CD covers are printed on gloss paper with high-quality photographs of you or the band.  Managers, producers, and A&R directors a like, are more inclined to pick up an act that looks together.  They don’t have time to figure out if this poorly imaged act has what it takes or not – And they very well might – But they don’t have the presentation.  In here lies what I consider to be your greatest ally.  If you will spend time and money to have your artist press kit not only look professional, but with an edge, you can convey 1) your image, 2) your marketability, 3) and your dedication and sincerity – This is not a fleeting moment or idea for you.  You’re in this for the long haul and your presentation states that.  Make anything in print that you send out, shine.



The next part of your presentation is in the phone calls, meetings, and grin and grip events, whether concerts, showcases or otherwise.  If you don’t have a natural ability to interact with individuals, you are going to have to practice.  And furthermore, there’s nothing wrong, and I would suggest, writing down on paper anything that you want to come to mind, before a phone conversation even begins.  If you’re bad with names, as many of us are, have those names written down, easily obtained in the middle of a call.  Prepare as much as you can before the conversation and be honest.  Honesty goes a long ways with people.  Most in the industry have “heard it all” and it’s so refreshing to hear somebody state, “I’m not sure, but I’ll find out.”  Speak with sincerity, honesty, but with confidence as well.  After all, you’ve got something unique and it’s your vocal career.  You need to sell them, but they also need to recognize the obvious, and that is that they’ve just discovered the next…


So as you begin or at least start looking at your singing career, look at these simple to implement principals that we have just looked at and know ahead of time that you are going to be specific, analytic, and purposeful in your singing career strategies.  Take a look at your strengths and weaknesses and be honest.  Ask others.  Don’t be afraid to change course or look at other singing alternatives as well.  We know that short articles are difficult to present every point of the equation, so don’t hesitate to contact us should you have further questions.

    Author: Tom Gauger
    For further information, the author can be contacted at 615-300-5030 and at http://www.reelmusician.com.  In addition, Mr. Gauger is available for consultations, seminars and jingle and song production.


Sunday, January 8, 2017

SINGERS Who Sing & Talent Agents Who Book

English: Penelope Jean - Publicist, TV Enterta...
Penelope Jean - Publicist, TV Entertainment Analyst, and Booking Agent (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


In the world of the music business, there are truly singers who sing and singers who don’t, along with talent booking agents who book and those that couldn’t sell cotton candy at the circus. Is it drive, talent or a mystical combination of “factors” that create singers and talent booking agents, or is it yet the pure unexplainable? Let’s look at some factors in this article as singers, looking to further their careers, try to find suitable representation.

As a former talent booking agent with the William Morris Agency, I can tell you that there are many factors that determine both effective agents and marketable singers and artists.  While there are many explainable factors, there certainly is the element of luck, the right place at the right time and the “Who knows, it just happened,” phenomenon. Let’s start with what we can determine and hopefully you will gain some insight into what effective booking agents look like and your securing one of them.

To begin with, there are many caliber of booking agents out there. As I’ve outlined in a previous article on booking talent, that you can find at ReelMusician, there are the order taking agents who book mainly headline acts, the agent who started in some agency somewhere and who branches out starting their own agency booking more of the “has been” acts and the lowest, but not always the least on the totem pole agents. These agents are usually friends of the artist or a manager looking to push their act before a major record deal signing, etc.

With each agent level comes a different approach. The order taking agent, with the larger well known talent agencies, isn’t going to be interested in your act unless there is interest and ongoing courting from a major record label. These agents take the “baby” acts and use leverage, with promoters who want the headline act, into a must take the baby act as well deal – And most promoters don’t have a problem and understand that this is part of the deal when playing in the big boys club. Unless you have a record deal or are very appealing and are drawing some interest from the labels or a big time manager, you won’t find yourself behind the desk of one of these agents. If you are trying to approach the agent at the top of the pyramid, you must recognize that image, packaging, appeal, and your knowing and talking the game to a tee, and not in artsy fartsy language, is going to be key.

I recommend that you really have your act together and don’t even begin to bother these individuals, not that they’re necessarily the best agents in the game, but certainly have more power and influence from position alone, before approaching them. Your artist bio, pictures, artist demos have to look like there label ready. And before that, you really need to have a manager and a manager working on securing an agent on your behalf.

Again, many more articles on this and other topics can be found at ReelMusician. So, unless you really have your act together, with management in place, don’t bother wasting yours or the agent’s time.

The next level down the agent totem pole will be not only be easier to gain access to, but easier to gain representation from. The middle line agents are hard working agents who make their bread and butter on the older, end of the product or market shelf life acts. These acts, because of name recognition, can make these agents a significant income. You will have to prove to this agent that you will not take up any more time than any other act that they are promoting. Why should they spend all of their time trying to book your act with nothing or little in return? This is a key question. Ask yourself, as an agent, what do I get out of this? - Phone bills and mailing costs or am I going to see a valid positive cash flow return on all of my time expended on this act? I want you to think about that question and reflect. This alone will help you not only relate, converse knowing their difficulties in booking, but ultimately help you secure a booking agent.

In the game of booking, you as an artist have to have something more than “hip and cool” and a “new” artist sound, but you have to be able to present to the seller, that being your agent, that he or she has something of value to sell with minimal headaches. You can’t possibly begin to imagine how hard it is to book some acts – when you start booking your own shows, with vested interest I might ad, you begin to touch on the realities of the agent’s day to day barrage of booking complexities. So begin to compile a mental list of positive booking attributes that you or your band can bring to the table.



As you look at either contemplating a manager, or a serious friend who wants a try at booking and management of your act, try to be reasonable in your business relationships. I’ve said it before, that everyone wants to be a star, but nobody wants to help pay for it. For the most part, artists just expect that booking agents and managers will pick up the exhaustive phone, mailing and press kit bills. You might inquire, if you are really serious about securing a business team, about helping out with some of the initial start-up costs trying to land your act on the map. It takes a tremendous amount of energy and money and just your willingness to help out alone, will tell a manager or booking agent that you are serious and not just “takers.” This alone, even if they decline the financial help, may be the key in determining the start of a successful relationship.

In closing, in order for you to succeed, you must remain in front of the masses and this is done not so much musically, but in your day to attitude and business focus and with your professional and well laid out blueprint for success. Feel free to contact us at the contact numbers that follow.


Thursday, December 22, 2016

Why SINGERS Must Conduct Band SOUND CHECK

When your band and you as the lead singer use electronic musical instruments such as the electric guitar, electric bass or the microphone etc, conducting a sound check is necessary to balance the sound of the instruments and your voice.

Your band members will sound check their own instruments and their systems such as the monitor first and then you, the singer or the vocal section will do your own sound check last once the sound system for the musical instruments are already well balanced. Sound check in this sequence will enable you to hear how you sound when you are actually singing with your band.

Crush at Badger Bowl
Photo by ibm4381

At the sound check, make sure that your microphone is free from its stand if you want to move around or dance during your singing performance. Also ask the sound equipment technicians for a monitor to be placed in front of you so that you can hear yourself sing. If you can get your hands on a pair of sound monitor earpiece, that will be better because this will give you more room to prance around and entertain your audience and fans.

How to sound check the singer's microphone?

Your singing voice when produced by the microphone should be louder and above the sounds produced by the band so that your voice can carry the songs well and able to portray your feel, song interpretation and emotions clearly. Sometimes, this may result in loud feed backs (that loud piercing screeching sound produced by the microphone) so much so that your sound technician or yourself must know where the maximum volume can be before the irritating screeching feedback occurs. The sound technician should mark this threshold on his sound board control.

During the crescendo parts of songs, move away from the microphone so that you do not trigger feedback and move back in again during the softer part of the songs. By doing this, you are not only able to control feed backs, you will also not irritate sensitive audience who may not enjoy loud singing. On the other hand, when the singing is soft and you are far away from your audience, they may not be able to make out what you are singing and that is why you need to move closer to the microphone when the interpretation of the song calls for you to sing softly.



It is important to watch out for consonants or lyrics beginning with 'P's and 'B's. When you are singing loudly into the microphone, these consonants may cause explosive pop pop sounds on the microphone. If you think 'M', you will be able to prevent 'please' and 'baby' exploding out of the speakers.

The final sound check

At the end of the sound check session, you and your band must run through a couple of songs. This is done not only because you want to hear whether the sound is good from the audience perspective but also whether all your band members can hear themselves, the band as a whole and sound from their monitors.